What I have learned about Denmark

 

Time flies! I have been living and studying in Denmark for over 2 years now 🙂 After all, I can say that I couldn’t be happier about my decision to live in Copenhagen. But there are a few things, that I have learnt here that I want to share with you. For example, that if there is no flag on top of the palace, the Queen is not home.

Skat

This word will be forever important in my new Danish life. It is both the name for your boyfriend or girlfriend, but also for the people you don’t want to owe money. Every year around April, people in Denmark wait anxiously for the tax report to see if they have to pay back a lot of money. Honestly, you should get a Danish friend to help with your taxes if you don’t understand their website and what you have to fill out. Otherwise you could have an unpleasant surprise next spring.

Sonderborg (2)

Beautiful Sønderborg


Jutland

In daily small- talk, people often ask me, how long I have been living in Denmark. I answer, that I have been studying here for 2 years, one of them in Sønderborg/Jutland. Most of the times the reaction is  “Oh Jutland isn’t really Denmark though 😀 “.
Well, apparently Jutland doesn’t belong to Denmark, it is just Jutland 😉

At the beach in Sønderborg

At the beach in Sønderborg

 

 

German in school

Most Danes I know, had an awful and mean German teacher in middle school or/and gymnasium and therefore don’t like the language. Others just don’t like German because it sounds aggressive (I hear that often outside of Denmark too..actually I hear it all the time, besides when I am in Germany. I think, German is a beautiful language..)

 

Babies outside

Danish mom’s leave their babies outside when they enter a shop, an office or a café. They leave them on their own with a baby monitor. I was surprised but the moms seem not be worried at all about the baby being taken away or some other things that might happen. It is normal here; it’s like leaving your bicycle in close distance but outside.

Little mermaid

Our Little Mermaid

 

The Danish language

I have studied English and French in school and Chinese in university now – so it is safe to say that I have experiences in learning a foreign language. Still, Danish is by far the most frustrating language to learn, even now when I understand a lot – it is hard for me to pronounce the words right. It seems like the Danish letters “g”, “a” and “d” have around a thousand different ways to be pronounced. And it still doesn’t make sense to me that the word “meget” is pronounced “ma-ahl”..and not like it’s written “meget”.

Their brother Sweden

Never compliment Sweden and say that they are better than Denmark, in anything. Never. Especially not after the recent football match.

Sweden

Never compliment Sweden over Denmark

 

Dane’s favorite word

There is a word in Danish (Swedish and Norwegian) that apparently can’t be translated in another language. You have to feel it and experience it to understand it.
So“hyggelig” is quite similar to the English word “cozy” (it is mostly translated like this in dictionaries as well), but that is not really the meaning. It means “feeling very comfortable (with someone maybe) and enjoying yourself”, but that is still not really the exact meaning.
I figured, that it is very difficult to express that feeling of “hyggelig”. I still haven’t found the exact meaning of it and by now I am too afraid to ask again.
So I just go with “cozy” or “heimisch fühlen”. Somewhere inbetween these two is “hyggelig”.


What I haven’t learned yet

– to say “Rødgrød med fløde” right

 

(Some of my other blog posts about: Part II of What I learned about Denmark and What I miss while living in Denmark )

first day in Copenhagen

The day I moved to Copenhagen

 

Tuni

 

Stay in Touch

Only blog updates

Feel free to leave a comment!

4 replies

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] If you are living in Denmark for some time now, you might enjoy my blog posts about what I’ve learned about Denmark  […]

  2. […] If you are  living in Denmark, you might enjoy my blog posts about what I’ve learned about Denmark  […]

  3. […] Therefore if you can avoid it, don’t rent a room, where you can’t register your CPR number. You will save yourself a lot of trouble and on top of it; you will only have legitimate rights if you rent a legal place. If you are already living in Denmark, you might enjoy my latest blog posts about what I’ve learned about Denmark  […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *